How To Use Body Language To Win More Negotiations

Have you read the other negotiator’s body language at the outset of a negotiation and made instant assumptions about him? During a negotiation, a great deal of nonverbal signals are cast. You can gain insights into the other negotiator’s mindset by observing why and when such body language signals occur.

The following are insights per what you should observe and how to alter his perspective, based on his intent and how you project your body language.

What to look for in the other negotiator:

To gain ‘real’ unfiltered displays of emotions from the opposing negotiator observe his micro expressions. Micro expressions occur in no more than 1 second. As such they’re fleeting but deliver a plethora of insight and information.

  • Observe micro expressions:

The 7 universal micro expressions are…

  1. Fear
  2. Anger
  3. Disgust
  4. Surprise
  5. Contempt
  6. Sadness
  7. Happiness

  • Listen for temperament:

Someone’s temperament, the combination of their mental, physical, and emotional traits can be glimpsed to assess their attitude. During a negotiation observe the phrases used to represent a thought along with the tonality projected, to gain insight indicating a shift in perspective. If you’re astute, you’ll be able to use such insight as guidance indicating when to shift your strategies and tactics in the negotiation.

Ways you can enhance your persona through body language:

  • Observe the shadow you cast:

Everyone casts an image of who they are, as perceived by the receiver. Attempt to project the image that gives you the proper status. There in will lay how you’ll create a positive persona in the negotiation.

  • Speak with energy:

Speaking with energy is meant to convey your conviction per the points you make. If energy is not conveyed in your sentiments, the perception can be that the points don’t have the level of influence you proclaim them to possess.

  • Make a point by pointing in rhythm:

There’s a degree of symphonically being attuned when pointing at the appropriate time in a negotiation. It’s akin to melodically leading someone’s mental thoughts to an unheard cadence. You can gain subliminal influence by emphasizing a point as you jab the air in an upward or downward motion. To the degree you do so aligned with the words you speak, you appear to be more convincing and believable.

  • Challenge while displaying confidence:

There will be times when you have to challenge the other negotiator by bluffing. It may come in the form of something you don’t know, but want to convince him that you do. When doing so, state your points and questions with confidence. Don’t allow your body language to belie the fact that you’re bluffing by half-heartedly making your point or challenge.

Above are some of the ways you can enhance the negotiation process by using the ability to read, accurately interpret, and cast the appropriate body language signals. If you adopt these insights, you’ll discover how to see the unseen. You’ll improve your chances of having a successful negotiation… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

Webinar How To Steps: Plan, Promote, Present

Webinars have become popular in the past couple of years for several reasons, the main one being logistics in terms of not having to leave your home or office to give them or participate in them. From a geographical standpoint, you can immediately see the advantage in the amount of time you will save.

Here is a quick and easy three-part guide to staging a successful webinar:

1- Planning. You will need to pick a date for you webinar and set up the software in advance. There are several choices for webinar software and services. I happen to believe that GoToWebinar is a good choice. So, you will need to register an account, pick the date of your first webinar, and then do a couple of practice runs with the software before the actual date of the webinar.

One good tip at this point would be to use two video screens, so that you can put the control panel for the webinar on one screen, and use the other one for your presentation; that is the screen that the participants in the webinar will see.

2- Promoting. If you are going to run a successful webinar, you need to promote it. You cannot rely on anybody just finding it by accident and wanting to register.

There are, of course, several ways to do this. One of the most efficient ways is to send out an invitation to your personal and professional mailing list. Many of the more popular webinar software and services will allow you to do this.

You are going to make the email as value driven and compelling as you can, so that it makes someone want to register. I would not recommend charging a fee your first time out. Get your feet wet by offering a free webinar, and in your invitation explain in detail what it is all about.

Another way to promote webinar is to use your social media connections, whether that is Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, or MySpace. You can simply let your connections know that the webinar is taking place, and again you must make sure the message that you send is clear and concise.

You could also promote the webinar through grassroots marketing word of mouth and through the telephone if you wanted to, but I think the most efficient way is defiantly by email.

3- Understanding the difference between your content and good context. Your content is, obviously, the information that you want to share, while context is the way that you share it.

If at all possible, I would recommend that you take some presentation training courses, but if you want to go it alone, there are a couple of points.

Make sure that your introduction, or the first five minutes of your webinar, includes an overview of what you will cover, so that people have enough reason to stick around for the duration.

Also, make sure that the introduction includes a little bit of what we call ETR (Earn the Right).

Tell a good story which shares your experience in a more entertaining way. Stories are fun to listen to, but they also help you keep your audience engaged, and help them learn more about you, so that you can build a little bit of trust along the way.

Try to stay away from PowerPoint as much as possible, so that you are able to change up your content when the questions start to come in. Remember, you do not always know what they want to learn, and it might be a good idea to ask them.

Finally you have to back in your webinar. It means making an offer for your product and/or services, which is really the whole point of the webinar, so that you can promote your business. We will discuss how to make a compelling offer in another article.

I would recommend in closing, if you have not ever staged a webinar before, that you try to seek out information from experts on how to do that. While you will learn from your mistakes, it is much easier to learn the information from somebody who is already giving successful webinars.

How to Become Highly Paid For Your Killer Closing Presentations

How you deliver your buying offer can make or break the sale. High-earning sellers inspire respect, confidence, credibility, and ignite a desire-to-acquire-from-the-buyer, but many salespeople lack consistency in their closing presentations and, as a result, often leave good money on the table, or even worse, fail to close the deal.

On the other hand, highly-paid sales professionals know how to close the deal before they make a presentation. They hold firmly to the belief that: There are no free presentations. Like good trial lawyers, they already know the answer before the question is asked. If there is any doubt about the outcome from a presentation, then that doubt will be clarified by the seller before the presentation is made. The secret to a smooth closing is: Both parties must honor an up-front agreement that was negotiated prior to the closing presentation.

Here are four sales-killing mistakes that will sabotage even your best closing presentations:

· Failure to make an up-front agreement with the prospect on what will be discussed and decided upon during the meeting.

· Failure to uncover Core Pain that motivates the prospect toward immediate pain relief.

· Failure to get a Budget (time and money) commitment, prior to the presentation.

· Failure to uncover hidden agendas before the buying offer is made.

To avoid these sales killers, structure your presentation into 3 main parts:

1. Opening; review of the facts and assumptions;

2. Solution; features, benefits and price of your product or service;

3. Closing; a call-to-action.

In the Opening, be sure to have complete agreement from the prospect on such key issues as; Pain, Money, and making a Decision, before proceeding. Lack of clarity and agreement at this stage will be fatal to closing the deal-and you will end up giving a FREE PRESENTATION. (Remember the rule: There are NO free presentations!)

Your Solution should demonstrate how your clients’ pain problems are cured by the features and benefits of your product. Always start with the biggest pain problem and work your way down the list. Often, you don’t have to complete a presentation because the biggest pain relief benefit is enough to close the sale. Be brief, simple and direct. Don’t raise new issues. Maintain good eye contact and watch the body language of your buyer. Allow the buyer to interrupt you, but don’t interrupt the buyer. Remember you need to be answering one key question from the buyer: What’s in it for me?

The Closing is the fulfillment of your buyer’s hopes and dreams through your products and services. People buy emotionally and justify intellectually. Your logical pain relief solution will motivate an easy buying decision. Gone are the days of high pressure gimmick closes.

Nevertheless, if you sense that your prospect is not motivated to buy; try the Thermometer Close. Ask: “On a scale of 0 to 10 (10 being ready to buy now) where do you fall?” If the answer is 5 or less, pack up and leave-you’ve blown it, learn from your mistakes. If the answer is between a 6 and 9, ask: “What needs to happen to get you to a 10?” Satisfy the concerns being raised, and then when the prospect is at 9 or 10, ask: “What do you want to do now?”At this point the buyer will close the deal for you, because with that question, you have transformed yourself, in your buyer’s eyes, into a trusted advisor who helped solve a painful problem. People like to buy from trusted professionals; not sold to by pesky product pushers.

Become a trusted advisor in the eyes of your prospects, and you will never give a free closing presentation again.