3 Building Blocks of Strong Visual Presentation to Investors

Investor presentation is an important event for every startup. It’s a possibility to show a product to public and build relationships with investors. The way it is prepared and conducted will be followed by investor’s decision to put money into the project or step aside. That is why the main goal of presentation to investors is to convince them that a product or service meets users’ needs. To achieve it, a presentation should be designed in a way to answer two main questions:

1. What is a product or service?
2. Why will users want it?

And remember that “no presentation is better than a weak one”. Keeping that in mind you should spend significant amount of time not only to develop a product, but also to build the right approach to present it.

One of the common ways to do a presentation is to make it visible using computer and special software like Microsoft Power Point (or any other). Actually, the way the presentation looks is the major thing, not the software used to create it.

The three building blocks of strong visual presentation to investors are Plan, Time and Visual Tools:

1. Make a PLAN for the presentation and put slides in order with it. A plan could be like this:
a) Introduction – who you and your company are.
b) Product description – what does it do, what problem it solves.
c) Description of usage – who and how will use it, why customers will want it.
d) Competitive advantages and success stories (if any).
e) Finance – sales and profit projections.
f) Call for investments.

2. TIME: don’t make long presentations if the opposite is not required. Your presentation should take about 10 minutes. So the number of slides that are sufficient is from 12 to 15. More slides will take the most of your time to read the text, not to explain information to investors. People won’t listen to you too long and lose interest to your presentation. And avoid presenting and driving presentation simultaneously. It’s better to ask someone of your team to turn slides during your talk.

3. VISUAL TOOLS:
a) Use at least 16 font size. No one is going to read the text with a telescope.
b) Don’t put much text on slides. Be short and precise. Use bullets to divide text into simple statements and use 2-4 statements per slide.
c) The text on slides must not have errors and typos. After completing the presentation, read it again carefully and correct all errors. Also you can give it to someone for proofreading.
d) Use schemes to show logical structures. A scheme can explain the cause-effect relation even better than bulleted text.
e) Use colors to make slides catchy. You may use corporate or any other colors, but keep in mind that they should be contrast. Green text on yellow background will look fuzzy and hard to read. Dark text on light background will look good. Light text on dark background is good for darken rooms and require powerful projector. Also try not to use more than three colors in presentation.
f) Be careful using background. Fancy textures can make the text hard-to-read. Also, if you are not going to show slides on your laptop, your texture might be absent on another computer.
g) Use pictures and photos to make greater impression of your words.
h) Use charts and diagrams to present figures. Put data labels and use readable font size. Try to avoid using 3D diagrams as they might be hard to understand.
i) Don’t use spreadsheets on slides. It’s better to pick up 3-5 the most important for you numbers and show them in text or on separate slide.
j) If you are presenting something web-based, make an off-line copy and use it. Internet connection can be unstable and die right when you need it.

Following those tips will help startups to provide visual support for their presentation and get investors’ attention and funding as well.

The Present Outside the Present

Those of us who’ve had small children will know the incredible but unforeseeable value of the refrigerator carton. Kids can make all sorts of things from robots to puppet theatres out of these cardboard structures. And, of course, how many parents out there have been bemused to give their infant toddler a gift at birthday or Christmas time only to find them more captivated by the box than the goodies inside?

I had one of these experiences recently. I had serendipitously taken part in an EzineArticles “100 articles in 100 days” challenge and only realised so after the event. Part of the challenge, of course, was a prize–a coffee mug adorned with “#HAHD” to signify the achievement. But, wait, there’s more.

When I responded to an email to register for my prize I thought at the time I’d be unlikely to actually receive it–being halfway around the world from Green Bay, Wisconsin, the home of EzineArticles, I was sure something would happen to see it get ‘lost in the post.’

I received this ‘present’ on my birthday. And not only was there a mug, but a pen, paper, some coffee, a mouse mat and more. But, the main thing that got my attention was the United States Postal Service ‘small flat box’ that the present came in.

This box was no ordinary box. I marvelled at it like it was sent from Mars or something. It had logos on it I hadn’t seen before. It specified the holding capacity in pounds not kilograms. It featured a small insignia map logo–a globe of the world, but not featuring Australia (Africa and Europe are featured in this ‘International Express Priority’ post actually). Finally, my address had “AUSTRALIA” marked in bold under the state details.

My wife and I mused for a good ten minutes about this box. It provided quite a pleasure-filled surprise for the day.

The lesson from this that I draw is, the simplest things can spur our minds. It also shows how big a world we live in. Having never travelled internationally, I’m awed by thoughts of places like America, the Middle East, and Europe.

The best things in life truly are free.

3 Top Tips On CV, Resume Presentation To Help You Land That Perfect Job

When you are looking for a new job you will undoubtedly have to produce an updated CV or resume as part of the application process. These are relatively short documents that on the one hand are easy to put together but on the other they are quite complex and easy to get wrong.

One of the first things to consider when putting a new resume or CV together is its presentation. The substance of it will also matter obviously but if it is not presented well then this can work against any good substance you have there and result in you not getting the job.

Our 3 top tips for getting the presentation of your CV and resume to a sufficient standard are as follows:

1. White space – you want to make the job of reading your CV/resume as easy as possible for the recruiter and one of the ways you can do this is to ensure there is plenty of white space on the page.

CV’s/resumes that try to cram as much in as possible and present themselves as one large block of text are very difficult for a recruiter to consider. Less is more when it comes to CV’s/resumes and you should therefore ensure that they are set out in clearly defined and headed sections and have plenty of white space in the margins and around the text on the page.

2. Use bullet points – following on from the last point you can drastically affect the presentation of the CV/resume by using bullet points for the entries. This will naturally mean there will be more white space on the page and it should encourage you to make succinct points rather than ramble on in long paragraphs.

Try to use a single bullet to cover a single point and try to express them in terms of the skills you have gained from your experience and an example of your experience to demonstrate each skill.

3. Fonts – it is important to tailor your CV/resume to the type of industry you are applying to and this includes the fonts you use. If it is a profession then you should be looking to use white or cream paper with black traditional fonts such as times new roman or arial to give your application that professional feel.

Do not be tempted to use colored paper and fancy fonts to stand out from the crowd as this will often work against you unless you are applying for a job in a particularly creative industry.