How To Use Body Language To Win More Negotiations

Have you read the other negotiator’s body language at the outset of a negotiation and made instant assumptions about him? During a negotiation, a great deal of nonverbal signals are cast. You can gain insights into the other negotiator’s mindset by observing why and when such body language signals occur.

The following are insights per what you should observe and how to alter his perspective, based on his intent and how you project your body language.

What to look for in the other negotiator:

To gain ‘real’ unfiltered displays of emotions from the opposing negotiator observe his micro expressions. Micro expressions occur in no more than 1 second. As such they’re fleeting but deliver a plethora of insight and information.

  • Observe micro expressions:

The 7 universal micro expressions are…

  1. Fear
  2. Anger
  3. Disgust
  4. Surprise
  5. Contempt
  6. Sadness
  7. Happiness

  • Listen for temperament:

Someone’s temperament, the combination of their mental, physical, and emotional traits can be glimpsed to assess their attitude. During a negotiation observe the phrases used to represent a thought along with the tonality projected, to gain insight indicating a shift in perspective. If you’re astute, you’ll be able to use such insight as guidance indicating when to shift your strategies and tactics in the negotiation.

Ways you can enhance your persona through body language:

  • Observe the shadow you cast:

Everyone casts an image of who they are, as perceived by the receiver. Attempt to project the image that gives you the proper status. There in will lay how you’ll create a positive persona in the negotiation.

  • Speak with energy:

Speaking with energy is meant to convey your conviction per the points you make. If energy is not conveyed in your sentiments, the perception can be that the points don’t have the level of influence you proclaim them to possess.

  • Make a point by pointing in rhythm:

There’s a degree of symphonically being attuned when pointing at the appropriate time in a negotiation. It’s akin to melodically leading someone’s mental thoughts to an unheard cadence. You can gain subliminal influence by emphasizing a point as you jab the air in an upward or downward motion. To the degree you do so aligned with the words you speak, you appear to be more convincing and believable.

  • Challenge while displaying confidence:

There will be times when you have to challenge the other negotiator by bluffing. It may come in the form of something you don’t know, but want to convince him that you do. When doing so, state your points and questions with confidence. Don’t allow your body language to belie the fact that you’re bluffing by half-heartedly making your point or challenge.

Above are some of the ways you can enhance the negotiation process by using the ability to read, accurately interpret, and cast the appropriate body language signals. If you adopt these insights, you’ll discover how to see the unseen. You’ll improve your chances of having a successful negotiation… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

When Making a Business Presentation – Create a Happy Ending With the 3Hs

What is the outcome and takeaway message?

We are now ready to be more precise in describing what you want the audience to think, feel and do both during and at the end of your presentation. An effective happy ending is written down. It should be about 20-25 words and cover 3 main areas. The “3Hs” – head, heart and hands. In other words, what do you want your audience to think, feel and do by the time your presentation finishes?

This process works for any audience. Your “happy ending” can be written with this thinking process:

Think with your head”

What do you want your audience to think during and at the end of your presentation?

Feel with your heart”

What do you want your audience to feel during and at the end of your presentation?

Do with your hands”

What do you want your audience to do during and at the end of your presentation?

Samples

Let’s take a sales situation. You are presenting to a client. Your intention is to influence and your purpose is to gain an agreement-in-principle for your proposal.

“Think with your head”

I want my client to think we are competent, capable and ideally suited to help them.

I want my client to think we understand their business situation and we are committed to help them improve it.

I want my client to think we are easy to work with and have the resources to provide excellent service.

“Feel with your heart”

I want my client to feel confident in our capabilities.

I want my client to feel certain that the outcomes of the proposal will be delivered.

I want my client to feel comfortable in our communication styles.

I want my client to feel we are the best choice.

“Do with your hands”

I want my client to express confirmation that the project objectives are in line with their expectations.

I want my client to understand the proposal options and indicate a preference.

I want my client to select a start date for the project.

I want my client to map out the next steps we take following the meeting.

Now edit this into a sentence that defines your happy ending for your presentation. For example, in the above example:

At the end of my presentation, my client will…

…think we are competent, capable and ideally suited to help them, feel comfortable in our communication styles, and select a project start date (23 words).

Use the happy ending approach to write your 25 words for all your presentations. It will clarify your thinking and help you focus on what you wish the audience to think, feel and do at the conclusion of your talk.

How to Become Highly Paid For Your Killer Closing Presentations

How you deliver your buying offer can make or break the sale. High-earning sellers inspire respect, confidence, credibility, and ignite a desire-to-acquire-from-the-buyer, but many salespeople lack consistency in their closing presentations and, as a result, often leave good money on the table, or even worse, fail to close the deal.

On the other hand, highly-paid sales professionals know how to close the deal before they make a presentation. They hold firmly to the belief that: There are no free presentations. Like good trial lawyers, they already know the answer before the question is asked. If there is any doubt about the outcome from a presentation, then that doubt will be clarified by the seller before the presentation is made. The secret to a smooth closing is: Both parties must honor an up-front agreement that was negotiated prior to the closing presentation.

Here are four sales-killing mistakes that will sabotage even your best closing presentations:

· Failure to make an up-front agreement with the prospect on what will be discussed and decided upon during the meeting.

· Failure to uncover Core Pain that motivates the prospect toward immediate pain relief.

· Failure to get a Budget (time and money) commitment, prior to the presentation.

· Failure to uncover hidden agendas before the buying offer is made.

To avoid these sales killers, structure your presentation into 3 main parts:

1. Opening; review of the facts and assumptions;

2. Solution; features, benefits and price of your product or service;

3. Closing; a call-to-action.

In the Opening, be sure to have complete agreement from the prospect on such key issues as; Pain, Money, and making a Decision, before proceeding. Lack of clarity and agreement at this stage will be fatal to closing the deal-and you will end up giving a FREE PRESENTATION. (Remember the rule: There are NO free presentations!)

Your Solution should demonstrate how your clients’ pain problems are cured by the features and benefits of your product. Always start with the biggest pain problem and work your way down the list. Often, you don’t have to complete a presentation because the biggest pain relief benefit is enough to close the sale. Be brief, simple and direct. Don’t raise new issues. Maintain good eye contact and watch the body language of your buyer. Allow the buyer to interrupt you, but don’t interrupt the buyer. Remember you need to be answering one key question from the buyer: What’s in it for me?

The Closing is the fulfillment of your buyer’s hopes and dreams through your products and services. People buy emotionally and justify intellectually. Your logical pain relief solution will motivate an easy buying decision. Gone are the days of high pressure gimmick closes.

Nevertheless, if you sense that your prospect is not motivated to buy; try the Thermometer Close. Ask: “On a scale of 0 to 10 (10 being ready to buy now) where do you fall?” If the answer is 5 or less, pack up and leave-you’ve blown it, learn from your mistakes. If the answer is between a 6 and 9, ask: “What needs to happen to get you to a 10?” Satisfy the concerns being raised, and then when the prospect is at 9 or 10, ask: “What do you want to do now?”At this point the buyer will close the deal for you, because with that question, you have transformed yourself, in your buyer’s eyes, into a trusted advisor who helped solve a painful problem. People like to buy from trusted professionals; not sold to by pesky product pushers.

Become a trusted advisor in the eyes of your prospects, and you will never give a free closing presentation again.